2024’s Biggest Skin Care Trends, According To Experts

With 2023 but a distant memory at this point, a fresh era has quickly begun in its place. When it comes to 2024’s biggest skin care trends, one thing is for certain: Beauty aficionados are not only more informed than ever before, but they’re very much ready to nix unnecessary […]

With 2023 but a distant memory at this point, a fresh era has quickly begun in its place.

When it comes to 2024’s biggest skin care trends, one thing is for certain: Beauty aficionados are not only more informed than ever before, but they’re very much ready to nix unnecessary steps (and products) that have long complicated their routines.

An Era Of Skin Minimalism

This year’s trends are all about taking a more minimal approach, without losing any bit of luxurious self-care or efficacy.

“In 2024, we’re really going to be moving away from multi-step routines,” says Dr. Margarita Lolis, M.D., a board-certified dermatologist and Mohs surgeon. “‘Skinstreaming’ is going to garner a lot more buzz, which is a good thing.”

In essence, this entails streamlining one’s skin care regimen and only using a few really good products. That said, Ian Michael Crumm, a celebrity esthetician and Beauty Curious podcast co-host, notes that it’s not just about arbitrarily dropping products in your current lineup.

“‘Skinimalism’ is about skin awareness, and knowing what is best for your complexion and sticking to it,” Crumm tells Bustle.

Thus, a part of the 2024 skin care journey is centered on not only learning about powerful, buzzy ingredients, but curating a regimen that caters to your unique needs.

15 Skin Trends For 2024

Below, find 15 skin care trends that will define 2024, as shared by Lolis, Crumm, and other industry experts Kate Somerville and dermatologist Dr. Dhaval G. Bhanusali, M.D.

1

It’s All About The Peptides, Baby

2

A “Skinstreaming” Routine

When it comes to skin, less is often more. “The concept behind ‘skinstreaming’ is scaling down your skin care routine to three or four simple steps,” says Lolis. “The 10-step skin care routines have taken a toll on patients’ skin — and wallet.”

3

Squalane Is A Hydrating Hero

4

Get Into Dermaplaning

Dermaplaning — which is a fancy way of shaving the peach fuzz off of your face — is expected to dominate the trends in 2024. “Dermaplaning has incredible skin smoothing and brightening results,” says Somerville.

As for ways to get in on the trend at home, The Skinny Confidential Hot Shave Razor ($25) is a solid pick.

5

A Year Of Skin Barrier Healing

The skin barrier — also known as the moisture barrier — will become more of a priority in 2024 and beyond.

“Dermatologists have noticed an increase in skin barrier damage in recent years as a result of applying too many products on the face that can be too harsh, irritating, and compromise the normal health of your skin,” says Lolis. “As a result, the current trend is going back to the basics and really focusing on skin barrier repair.”

As for specific ingredients, Somerville points to squalane and ceramides — which you can get via the Paula’s Choice Resist Barrier Repair Advanced Moisturizer ($38).

6

Fill Up On Vitamin C

In the ever-evolving world of skin care, antioxidant-rich vitamin C remains a staple ingredient. “Vitamin C has been the gold standard, but formulations tend to break down quickly and simply aren’t tolerable to those with sensitive skin,” says Dr. Bhanusali, a board-certified dermatologist and founder of Hudson Dermatology & Laser Surgery.

His take? There will be more innovation within the space this year, so expect to see smarter formulas containing the skin-brightening ingredient.

7

Total Enzyme Takeover

Yet another buzzword to keep in mind for the upcoming months is enzymes. “Incorporating these in skin care helps avoid and erase signs of cellular aging on the skin, such as laxity, wrinkles, pigmentation, and weakened barrier function,” says Lolis, who says more products are including enzymes within their formulas.

Hailey Bieber’s Rhode is getting in on the enzyme takeover early in 2024, with a pineapple enzyme-filled cleanser that’s set to drop at the end of January. Crumm also points to the Goldfaden MD Fresh a Peel Multi-Acid Resurfacing Peel ($85), which pairs the gentle lactic acid with exfoliating fruit enzymes to brighten the skin.

8

Cell-Protecting Ectoin

You’ll also see a lesser-known active all over the shelves in 2024: ectoin. And this is a win for the skin barrier and sensitive skin types.

“Ectoin is another ingredient to look for this year,” says Lolis. “This little molecule is remarkable in its ability to bind water and form complexes that surround cells, enzymes, proteins, and other biomolecules, essentially forming a protective shell around them.” Besides protecting your skin, it also boosts the skin barrier, increases hydration, and improves elasticity, she explains — all while being super gentle.

9

CO2 Lift As A Go-To Treatment

When it comes to on-trend beauty treatments, Lolis says one in particular is on the rise. “A regenerative skin care treatment I love is a CO2 lift,” she tells Bustle. “It is a way to increase oxygen content in the skin without injections or going into a chamber.”

Essentially, it involves applying a topical carboxytherapy gel mask to the skin — and this works to accelerate healing, stimulate fibroblasts, and increase hydration and plumpness, says Lolis, who notes that it’s a fave amongst celebs as a pre-red carpet treatment.

11

Hello, Multi-Purpose Sunscreen

In line with the “skinstreaming” trend, sunscreens that provide more than just sun protection are becoming a total must. “A sunscreen that not only protects against UV rays, but also includes additional skin care benefits like antioxidants and hydration, encourages daily use,” says Crumm. “There are so many amazing formulas coming to market that have additional benefits.”

Bhanusali also sees a rise in SPFs with formulations that absorb so well it looks as though nothing was even applied — even mineral options. “While mineral sunscreens are always in demand, it’s only now that the formulations are transitioning from chalky casts to nice, beautiful formulas,” he says.

The OLEHENRIKSEN Banana Bright Mineral Sunscreen ($35) is a good choice, as it offers both vitamin C and SPF 30, all in a mineral-based formula.

12

We Have Skin Tools At Home

This year, experts are seeing a boom in at-home facial tools with smarter technology than ever before. Somerville recommends investing in one (or a handful) to add a boost to your minimalist skin care regimen.

One favorite among A-listers? The SolaWave Advanced Red Light Therapy Skincare Device ($149), which uses the power of LED light therapy, vibration, heat, and microcurrent to enhance the appearance of your skin.

13

Embrace Skin-clusivity

From stars like Millie Bobby Brown sharing makeup-free selfies to A-listers like Pamela Anderson flaunting her bare-faced glow — inclusivity within the industry has become a non-negotiable.

Lolis believes that the positive shifts will continue. “Skin care brands are increasingly catering to a wider range of skin tones and types,” she tells Bustle. “I’ve also seen more interest around peri- and menopausal skin.”

14

Gentle Retinols Reign

With an influx of gentler retinol formulations on the market, Bhanusali suspects the category will continue to rise in the year to come. “I expect to see better formulations that emphasize tolerability while still maintaining efficacy,” he tells Bustle.

15

Let Body Care Have Its Moment, Too

Body care’s main character moment isn’t going anywhere; in fact, it’s only getting more targeted. “Patients will finally focus more on the neck and hands, which are a dead giveaway of age,” says Lolis.

For a lush shower experience, try the Saltair Golden Hour Oil-Infused Body Wash ($15).

Experts:

Dr. Margarita Lolis, M.D., a board-certified dermatologist and Mohs surgeon

Ian Michael Crumm, a celebrity esthetician and Beauty Curious podcast co-host

Kate Somerville, skin care expert and founder of her eponymous beauty line

Dr. Dhaval Bhanusali, M.D., a board-certified dermatologist and founder of Hudson Dermatology & Laser Surgery

Studies referenced:

Cheng, W. (2022). Protective Effect of Ectoin on UVA/H2O2-Induced Oxidative Damage in Human Skin Fibroblast Cells. Applied Sciences. 2022; 12(17):8531. https://doi.org/10.3390/app12178531

Coderch, L. (2004). Ceramides and skin function. Am J Clin Dermatol. doi: 10.2165/00128071-200304020-00004.

Heinrich, U. (2007). In vivo assessment of Ectoin: a randomized, vehicle-controlled clinical trial. Skin Pharmacol Physiol. 2007;20(4):211-8. doi: 10.1159/000103204. Epub 2007 May 23. PMID: 17519560.

Huang, ZR. (2009). Biological and pharmacological activities of squalene and related compounds: potential uses in cosmetic dermatology. Molecules. 2009 Jan 23;14(1):540-54. doi: 10.3390/molecules14010540. PMID: 19169201; PMCID: PMC6253993.

Jeong, S. (2019). Anti-Wrinkle Benefits of Peptides Complex Stimulating Skin Basement Membrane Proteins Expression. Int J Mol Sci. 2019 Dec 20;21(1):73. doi: 10.3390/ijms21010073. PMID: 31861912; PMCID: PMC6981886.

Kauth, M. (2022). Topical Ectoine Application in Children and Adults to Treat Inflammatory Diseases Associated with an Impaired Skin Barrier: A Systematic Review. Dermatol Ther (Heidelb). 2022 Feb;12(2):295-313. doi: 10.1007/s13555-021-00676-9. Epub 2022 Jan 17. PMID: 35038127; PMCID: PMC8850511.

Kono, T. (2021). Clinical significance of the water retention and barrier function-improving capabilities of ceramide-containing formulations: A qualitative review. J Dermatol. doi: 10.1111/1346-8138.16175.

Makrantonaki, E., Ganceviciene, R., & Zouboulis, C. (2011). An update on the role of the sebaceous gland in the pathogenesis of acne. Dermato-endocrinology, 3(1), 41–49. https://doi.org/10.4161/derm.3.1.13900

Nguyen, TQ. (2021). A Randomized, Double-blind, Placebo-controlled Clinical Study Investigating the Efficacy and Tolerability of a Peptide Serum Targeting Expression Lines. J Clin Aesthet Dermatol. 2021 May;14(5):14-21. Epub 2021 May 1. PMID: 34188744; PMCID: PMC8211334.

Trevisol, TC. (2022). An overview of the use of proteolytic enzymes as exfoliating agents. J Cosmet Dermatol. 2022 Aug;21(8):3300-3307. doi: 10.1111/jocd.14673. Epub 2021 Dec 12. PMID: 34897928.

Uchida, Y. (2021). Ceramides in Skin Health and Disease: An Update. Am J Clin Dermatol. doi: 10.1007/s40257-021-00619-2.

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